How to React to a Minor Injury

Although minor injuries don’t threaten lives, it’s still important to react to them properly to reduce the risk of complications like infection. Everyone should know how to properly clean wounds and apply bandaging to keep them protected. Here are some other first aid tips: Bandaging Wounds Before bandaging a minor wound, clean it thoroughly. Remove dirt and debris, and use clear water. You might need to remove debris with tweezers. Once the wound is clean, stop the bleeding by applying pressure with a sterile cloth. Apply antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin, and cover the wound securely with a bandage. You can leave minor scrapes and cuts uncovered, but if the wound looks deeper than the surface, don’t take chances. Removing Splinters Splinters are painful but relatively easy to treat. If the splinter is sticking out, you can pull it out of the skin with tweezers at the same angle it went in. Wash the splintered area first, and clean your tweezers with an alcohol-dipped cotton…

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How to React to a Serious Injury

Injuries, especially serious ones, can be very dangerous if the people around the victim don’t react properly or in a timely manner. Heavy bleeding, for example, needs pressure applied to quell the flow. Spinal injuries, on the other hand, should be left alone until professionals arrive. You will likely encounter these or other emergencies. Educate yourself now so you can help someone in need if the situation arises. Don’t Move the Person Never move an injured person unless you are sure you can do so without worsening the injury. Moving the victim almost always worsens the situation, particularly in cases of sprained or broken bones. If the person is conscious, encourage him or her to stay still until EMS or other professional help arrives. Keep the injured person on his or her back or side. Call 911 Call 911 for any severe injury. If you can’t make it to the car because of a break, if bleeding won’t stop, or if you are having numbness…

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The Most Commonly Broken Bones

Breaking a bone is a painful experience – one the patient won’t soon forget. They’re a fairly common injury, however, with more than 6 million people suffering from a broken bone every year. Many Americans share broken bone experiences. Knowing the bones that are broken most often could help you prevent a break. Arms Arms account for 50% of broken bones in adults. They commonly break along the humerus of the upper arm or radius of the ulna in the lower arm. As with most bones, an arm break can be clean or result in several fractures. Broken arms usually occur as you brace for a fall or upon impact. Broken arms can be the result of sports injuries, falls from heights, or a simple slip and fall. Legs and Feet The expression “break a leg” is not just for theater aficionados. Breaking a leg or foot is one of the most painful experiences a patient can have. About 25% of the bones in the…

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Reasons Why Annual Checkups Are Important

They say an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but yearly checkups are much more important for long-term health. Frequent visits to a health care professional can help catch signs of serious illnesses before they progress too far or become untreatable. There are several other benefits of annual checkups as well. Educating Yourself Most people know the basics of a healthy lifestyle – eating healthfully, exercising, and getting adequate sleep. A yearly checkup lets your doctor know you are doing these things and lets him or her suggest changes based on your individual health. If you have an iron deficiency, your doctor may prescribe more protein. As you age, he or she may advise a transition from high-impact aerobics to low-impact workouts like yoga. Disease Risk Review Everyone is at risk for different diseases at certain times. An annual checkup lets the doctor reassess risk for you and your family members, whether they are small children or elderly parents and grandparents. Some conditions require…

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The Importance of Vaccinations

Vaccinating your children and yourself is vital for personal health, but it’s also crucial for herd immunity, which protects those too young or ill to vaccinate. Maintain a proper vaccination schedule for yourself and your children to avoid contracting serious infections. How Immunity Works The immune system is a network of cells, organs, fluids, and glands located throughout the body. You are born with an immune system that grows and becomes stronger as you do. The immune system recognizes germs, or antigens, and produces antibodies to fight specific ones. The antibodies produced to fight the measles virus, for instance, are different from those produced to fight rubella or mumps. Some people, particularly those who are anti-vaccination, assume the best way to build immunity is to get sick first. They distrust vaccines because vaccines have long been associated with complications and disabilities such as autism. In reality, there is no link between vaccinations and disease or disability; studies purporting such links have been discredited. Vaccines contain…

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The Biggest Expenses for Hospitals

Running a hospital is not inexpensive. Every facility has to deal with big costs for supplies, equipment, and employees. You may be surprised to find out just how much your local physician’s office has to spend to keep running. Some of the highest costs for medical facilities are the ones of which patients are the least aware. Research and Teaching Many hospitals, especially those affiliated with universities, serve as teaching or research facilities. These hospitals are needed to train new medical personnel and research cutting-edge medical treatments. However, they are some of the most expensive to maintain. Teaching and research hospitals rely on grants, often used to cover experimental procedures and service improvements. Grants can be difficult to obtain and some must be renewed on a yearly basis. If hospitals lose grant funding, they cannot continue their work, so they put a lot of energy into using grants wisely. Technology Technology is one of the most needed, and most expensive, parts of the medical field.…

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Medical Field Positions With the Biggest Salaries

The medical field is one of the most consistent and expansive industries in the country. However, some positions are more profitable than others are. If you’re curious about the top paying medical careers, this list can help you find the best one for you. Cardiology Cardiologists are well known for making money, and considering the work they go through to specialize, they should be. The average salary for a cardiologist is about $376,000 a year. Cardiologists specialize in diagnosing and treating heart-related conditions, using either invasive or noninvasive techniques. Noninvasive cardiology focuses more on congenital heart problems, coronary diseases, and complications than invasive cardiology does. Cardiology requires one of the highest experience levels in medicine. Orthopedics Orthopedists are some of the highest-paid physicians in the medical field, with an average salary of $421,000 per year. Orthopedists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions, including arthritis, osteoporosis, and muscular dystrophy. Some orthopedists work with patients who have cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and similar…

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Cognitive Behavioral and Anxiety

Anxiety disorders are, unfortunately, a common reality for a large portion of Americans. They are the most common mental illness in the United States, accounting for 40 million Americans total. Fortunately, cognitive behavioral therapy offers positive results for most sufferers. What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy? Cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, unites thinking processes, or cognitions, with behavior. In other words, CBT shows you how you think and how that influences what you do. CBT takes focus away from external events that trigger anxiety and helps the client focus on his or her perceptions of external events. Different people have different perceptions of the same events. A person with no anxiety might get an invitation to a holiday party and think, “This sounds fun! I love meeting new people!” In contrast, someone with anxiety might think, “I don’t want to go. What if I do something stupid? What if I say the wrong thing?” Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps that person find where those thoughts come from, what…

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Top Tips for Improving Immune Health

Your immune system is a crucial part of staying healthy. With the cold weather, more people stay indoors. As a result, they’re more likely to pass germs back and forth and spread illness. With the right preventive measures, though, you can stay healthy this winter and keep those around you a little healthier, too. Treat Your Body Well Everyone knows how to do this – eat right, exercise, and maintain a healthy weight. That said, many people don’t enact what they know. Eating right can be a struggle; healthy foods are often more expensive than processed ones. Maintaining a healthy weight and a good sleep schedule is also hard, especially during the holidays. But making the effort will reap great results. Small changes, such as eating one extra fruit or vegetable a day or going to bed 30 minutes early, add up to a stronger immune system. Don’t Rely on Immunity-Boosting Products Supplements, energy drinks, and similar products claim to boost immunity but don’t yield…

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Top Five Qualities of a Good Doctor

The right physician can make all the difference when it comes to meeting your health care needs. It’s natural to seek the best and most knowledgeable doctor, but how do you know when you’ve found that person? Although every physician is different, there are key signs to look for when seeking the right one for you. Professionalism The best doctors maintain professionalism at all times. They respect doctor-patient confidentiality and follow medical ethics to the letter. A professional doctor is no respecter of persons; he or she treats patients regardless of lifestyle choices, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or disability. The professional physician maintains some distance, so as not to favor some patients over others. Empathy Professional distance does not mean lack of compassion. The best physicians treat their patients with warmth and empathy, also called bedside manner. Studies have shown that patients who believe they have empathetic doctors recover more quickly and completely. In contrast, patients whose doctors stress them out may actually get worse.…

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